Friday, September 28, 2018

Final Call for Submissions: SEMSN 14.2

Dear Colleagues,

This is the final call for submissions for the Fall/Winter 2018 issue of SEM Student News. Continuing our previous issues’ theme of music and politics, this new issue (vol. 14, no. 2) will focus on internal, academic, and institutional politics in relation to ethnomusicology—in other words, Politics in/of Ethnomusicology. We hope that this focus will encourage submissions concerning politics within our field/discipline, as well as institutions closely affiliated with ethnomusicology, particularly regarding our positionality as students and workers. We are seeking article submissions on any topic but will give preference to those that fit within our theme. Likewise, we will consider submissions from both students and working scholars alike, and encourage authors to submit pieces in a variety of media.

Submissions may be written, photographic, or multimedia (written with visual, audio, and/or video components). We are currently accepting submissions for the following categories:
  • Original photography related to the issue’s theme [accompanied by necessary permissions and appropriately publishable captions]
  • Student submissions (c. 200–250 words) for our “Thoughts from the Field” column [relating students' personal perspectives and experiences to the issue's main theme; please contact the editor at semstudentnews@gmail.com for more specific details]
  • Student articles (c. 500–1500 words) [related or unrelated to the theme of the issue]
  • Student response column (c. 500–1500 words) [responding to a previous issue of SEM Student News or something else in the world of ethnomusicology today]
  • Professional submissions for our
    • “Dear SEM” column (c. 250 words) [related to the issue’s theme and speaking toward student concerns within both ethnomusicology and academia-at-large, especially in regards to navigating the current climate of the tenure system];
    • Or individual articles (c. 500–1000 words) [related or unrelated to the issue’s theme, and speaking toward student interests, concerns, experiences, opportunities, etc.]
If you would like to submit a piece, please contact the editor at semstudentnews@gmail.com. We also welcome any other ideas, comments, and questions. Submissions should follow Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition (author-date). Files should be submitted in .docx (text), .jpg (photography and images), .mp3 or .flac (audio), and .mp4 (video) formats no later than October 8, 2018. Be sure to include your contact information and university affiliation in your email. Please feel free to share this call widely.

Best regards,

Davin Vidigal Rosenberg, Editor
Eugenia Siegel Conte, Incoming Editor

Thursday, September 13, 2018

2nd Call for Submissions: SEMSN 14.2

Dear Colleagues,

This is the second call for submissions for the Fall/Winter 2018 issue of SEM Student News. Continuing our previous issues’ theme of music and politics, this new issue (vol. 14, no. 2) will focus on internal, academic, and institutional politics in relation to ethnomusicology—in other words, Politics in/of Ethnomusicology. We hope that this focus will encourage submissions concerning politics within our field/discipline, as well as institutions closely affiliated with ethnomusicology, particularly regarding our positionality as students and workers. We are seeking article submissions on any topic but will give preference to those that fit within our theme. Likewise, we will consider submissions from both students and working scholars alike, and encourage authors to submit pieces in a variety of media.

Submissions may be written, photographic, or multimedia (written with visual, audio, and/or video components). We are currently accepting submissions for the following categories:
  • Original photography related to the issue’s theme [accompanied by necessary permissions and appropriately publishable captions]
  • Student submissions (c. 200–250 words) for our “Thoughts from the Field” column [relating students' personal perspectives and experiences to the issue's main theme; please contact the editor at semstudentnews@gmail.com for more specific details]
  • Student articles (c. 500–1500 words) [related or unrelated to the theme of the issue]
  • Student response column (c. 500–1500 words) [responding to a previous issue of SEM Student News or something else in the world of ethnomusicology today]
  • Professional submissions for our
    • “Dear SEM” column (c. 250 words) [related to the issue’s theme and speaking toward student concerns within both ethnomusicology and academia-at-large, especially in regards to navigating the current climate of the tenure system];
    • Or individual articles (c. 500–1000 words) [related or unrelated to the issue’s theme, and speaking toward student interests, concerns, experiences, opportunities, etc.]
If you would like to submit a piece, please contact the editor at semstudentnews@gmail.com. We also welcome any other ideas, comments, and questions. Submissions should follow Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition (author-date). Files should be submitted in .docx (text), .jpg (photography and images), .mp3 or .flac (audio), and .mp4 (video) formats no later than October 8, 2018. Be sure to include your contact information and university affiliation in your email. Please feel free to share this call widely.

Best regards,

Davin Vidigal Rosenberg, Editor
Eugenia Siegel Conte, Incoming Editor

Monday, August 20, 2018

Call for Applications: Associate Editors

Dear Colleagues,

SEM Student News is currently seeking one or more associate editors to join its student-led team as regular staff contributors. The start date for associate editor positions begins immediately with our upcoming Fall/Winter 2018 issue (Music and Politics II: Politics in/of Ethnomusicology) and continues for a term of at least four issues (two years). Applicants should be students currently registered in a graduate degree program and conducting music research in ethnomusicology or a related field/discipline. We especially encourage Masters and early PhD students to apply.

Associate Editors are responsible for reviewing and editing materials as they are submitted for each issue, following deadlines set by the Editor and Assistant Editor. Prior publication or editorial experience is recommended but not required; detailed knowledge of Chicago Manual of Style  author-date formatting (see Ethnomusicology and recent issues of SEM Student News for examples) is essential.

Screened applicants will be provided with a short piece to edit, containing stylistic, grammatical, and formatting issues. They will be asked to edit the piece within a two-day period and return it to the editors containing track comments indicating corrections and suggestions.

To apply, please send a CV along with a brief statement of your experience and interest (c. 250 words) and a sample article (c. 750–1000 words) to semstudentnews@gmail.com no later than September 20, 2017. Writing samples should illustrate ability, style, and perspective. We will consider applicants’ sample articles for publication in our Fall/Winter 2018 issue, especially if they pertain to our current theme. Interested applicants can read our recent call for submissions for more information on our forthcoming issue.

Please feel free to request further information by contacting the editors at semstudentnews@gmail.com and to share this posting with anyone who might be interested in the position.

Best regards,

Davin Vidigal Rosenberg, Editor
Eugenia Siegel Conte, Incoming Editor

Tuesday, August 14, 2018

Call for Submissions: SEMSN 14.2

Dear Colleagues,

This is the first call for submissions for the Fall/Winter 2018 issue of SEM Student News. Continuing our previous issues’ theme of music and politics, this new issue (vol. 14, no. 2) will focus on internal, academic, and institutional politics in relation to ethnomusicology—in other words, Politics in/of Ethnomusicology. We hope that this focus will encourage submissions concerning politics within our field/discipline, as well as institutions closely affiliated with ethnomusicology, particularly regarding our positionality as students and workers. We are seeking article submissions on any topic but will give preference to those that fit within our theme. Likewise, we will consider submissions from both students and working scholars alike, and encourage authors to submit pieces in a variety of media.

Submissions may be written, photographic, or multimedia (written with visual, audio, and/or video components). We are currently accepting submissions for the following categories:
  • Original photography related to the issue’s theme [accompanied by necessary permissions and appropriately publishable captions]
  • Student submissions (c. 200–250 words) for our “Thoughts from the Field” column [relating students' personal perspectives and experiences to the issue's main theme; please contact the editor at semstudentnews@gmail.com for more specific details]
  • Student articles (c. 500–1500 words) [related or unrelated to the theme of the issue]
  • Student response column (c. 500–1500 words) [responding to a previous issue of SEM Student News or something else in the world of ethnomusicology today]
  • Professional submissions for our
    • “Dear SEM” column (c. 250 words) [related to the issue’s theme and speaking toward student concerns within both ethnomusicology and academia-at-large, especially in regards to navigating the current climate of the tenure system];
    • Or individual articles (c. 500–1000 words) [related or unrelated to the issue’s theme, and speaking toward student interests, concerns, experiences, opportunities, etc.]
If you would like to submit a piece, please contact the editor at semstudentnews@gmail.com. We also welcome any other ideas, comments, and questions. Submissions should follow Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition (author-date). Files should be submitted in .docx (text), .jpg (photography and images), .mp3 or .flac (audio), and .mp4 (video) formats no later than October 8, 2018. Be sure to include your contact information and university affiliation in your email. Please feel free to share this call widely.

Best regards,

Davin Vidigal Rosenberg, Editor
Eugenia Siegel Conte, Incoming Editor

Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Volume 14, Number 1: Music and Politics

We are pleased to announce the publication of SEM Student News Volume 14, Number 1. This issue focuses on a theme of music and politics and features articles on various topics, including Glocal politics in Bavarian slang rap, political discourse in Janelle Monáe's "Q.U.E.E.N.," music and conflict resolution in Israeli-Palestinian relations, affirmative consent and the ethics of fieldwork, and more. We hope you will enjoy and find use for the many excellent contributions by student and senior scholars.

You can read the issue here and join the conversation on our Facebook page.

Please feel free to forward this message and share the issue widely.

Best regards,
Davin Vidigal Rosenberg
Editor, SEM Student News

Selected Course Readings: “Rhythm of Change: African Music and African Politics”

The following bibliography is a supplement to SEM President Gregory Barz's letter, The Coextensive Moment of Music and Politics in Africa: A Pedagogical Perspective, in SEM Student News 14.1, Spring/Summer 2018.

Selected Course Readings
Agawu, Kofi. 2016. “Music and/in Society.” In The African Imagination in Music, 27–64. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Aidi, Hisham. 2014. Rebel Music: Race, Empire, and the New Muslim Youth Culture. New York: Pantheon.
Allen, Tony. 2013. An Autobiography of the Master Drummer of Afrobeat. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.
Anderson, Benedict. 1983. “Introduction,” “Cultural Roots,” “The Origins of National Consciousness.” In Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origins of Nationalism, 11–16, 17–40, 41–49. London: Verso.
Ansell, Gwen. 2004. “Jazz for the Struggle, and the Struggle for Jazz.” In Soweto Blues: Jazz, Popular Music, and Politics in South Africa. New York: Continuum.
Asante Darko, Kwaku. 2000. “Reggae Rhetoric and the Pan-African Risorgimento.” Mots Pluriel 16. http://motspluriels.arts.uwa.edu.au/MP1600kad.html.
Askew, Kelly M. 2002. Performing the Nation: Swahili Music and Cultural Politics in Tanzania. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

Friday, June 8, 2018

Audiovisual Frames: What Films Can Do: An Interview with Jeff Roy

By Diego Pani (Memorial University of Newfoundland)


*This column also appears in SEM Student News 14.1, Spring/Summer 2018.

Ethnomusicologists engage with media production continuously. Starting from recording music making, using audiovisual technologies pushes our field toward new narrative forms, where audio and video outputs integrate not only into writing but become the very core of research projects. This column provides a space for thinking on the politics of audiovisual representation in ethnomusicological research by exploring the work of researchers who seek to overcome the limits of written scholarly production via documentary filmmaking, photo reportage, audio recording, and online platforms.

Jeff Roy. Photo by Ryan Ballard.

I first came across Jeff Roy’s work when I read his 2015 doctoral thesis, "Ethnomusicology of the Closet: (Con)Figuring Transgender-Hijra Identity Through Documentary Filmmaking," where he actively engages his critical use of documentary filmmaking inside Indian trans-hijra performance with the (con)figuration of trans-hijra LGBTIQ+ identity.

Having earned his PhD at the University of California, Los Angeles, in 2015, Jeff Roy is now a Postdoctoral Fellow at Le Centre d’études de l’Inde et de l’Asie du Sud at Université Paris Sciences et Lettres. He has worked as a director for several documentaries, including the medium-length Mohammed to Maya (2013) and the documentary series Music in Liminal Spaces (2012–2013), fostering a research commitment deeply connected with his public engagement as an activist for the rights of the Indian LGBTIQ+ community.

I chose to ask him some questions that are strictly related to his audiovisual work, his public role as an activist, and more broadly, how today’s ethnomusicologists can engage with documentary production and the public dissemination of their research results.

Sunday, April 22, 2018

Thinking Beyond Your Degree: Eleven Suggestions for a Competitive Job Search

By Dr. Rebecca Dirksen (Indiana University)


*This article originally appeared in SEM Student News Volume 12.1, Spring/Summer 2016.

There’s a great deal of handwringing over the state of today’s job market. This anxiety makes sense: we are facing restructuring of the academic world, with a move toward fewer tenure-track positions for humanities scholars. Moreover, there’s a generalized (and often poorly articulated and thus poorly received) antipathy toward academics, as public dialogues turn to “elitism,” “irrelevancy,” and “employability.” Technically, however, academic job rates for early career ethnomusicologists have been relatively constant if not higher over the past several years, based on the unscientific measure of job postings to the job wiki, ethnomusicology-related listservs, and the Chronicle—although as a discipline we have no firm grasp on where these figures will stand in just five years. But let’s be blunt: even the most accomplished ABDs and recent PhDs with the best connections and the most exciting, cutting-edge research are not guaranteed an institutional home at a university. That said, there’s a comparatively strong market outside the university setting for those with serious public/applied/activist research skills. And there’s an extensive and growing range of available tools and resources that have opened up tremendous latitude for self-designed and directed careers.

So it may be time to reframe a solution to job market stresses: ethnomusicology graduate students might be best advised to build the skills necessary to be a competitive applicant for university and community college jobs while simultaneously positioning themselves to pursue other avenues. Landing a job on either “path” doesn’t preclude anyone from also walking down the other “path.” Academic work and public sector/applied work are not mutually exclusive categories. With this in mind, I’d like to share a few thoughts I’ve had while navigating the process of becoming an applied/engaged scholar, and as I now reflect on how best to assist my own graduate students.

Sunday, March 25, 2018

Final Call for Submissions: SEMSN 14.1

Dear Colleagues,

This is the final call for submissions for the Spring/Summer 2018 issue of SEM Student News. This new issue, vol. 14, no. 1, will focus on a theme of Music and Politics with particular attention to music-making as political intervention and discourse. We are seeking article submissions on any topic, but will give preference to those that fit within our theme’s area of discussion. Likewise, we will consider submissions from both students and working scholars alike, and encourage authors to submit pieces in a variety of media.

Submissions may be written, photographic, or multimedia (written with visual, audio, and/or video components). We are currently accepting submissions for the following categories:
  • Original photography related to the issue’s theme
  • Student submissions (c. 200–250 words) for our “Thoughts from the Field” column [relating students' personal perspectives and experiences in the field to the issue's main theme]
  • Student articles (c. 500–1500 words) [related or unrelated to the theme of the issue]
  • Student response column (c. 500–1500 words) [responding to a previous issue of SEM Student News or something else in the world of ethnomusicology today]
  • Professional submissions for our
    • “Dear SEM” column (c. 250 words) [related to the issue’s theme and responding to the following prompt: “Reflecting upon your own knowledge and experience engaging with music-making in politicized contexts, what advice can you offer students regarding the ethics of fieldwork in instability, that is, how to ethically and adeptly navigate highly-political music research?”];
    • Or individual articles (c. 500–1000 words) [related or unrelated to the issue’s theme, and speaking toward student interests, concerns, experiences, opportunities, etc.]
If you would like to submit a piece, please contact the editor at semstudentnews@gmail.com. We also welcome any other ideas, comments, and questions. Submissions should follow Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition (author-date). Files should be submitted in .docx (text), .jpg or .tiff (photography and images), .mp3 or .flac (audio), and .mp4 (video) formats no later than April 2, 2018. Be sure to include your contact information and university affiliation in your email. Please feel free to share this call widely.

--
Davin Vidigal Rosenberg
Editor, SEM Student News

Friday, March 2, 2018

2nd Call for Submissions: SEM Student News Vol 14.1

Dear Colleagues,

This is the second call for submissions for the Spring/Summer 2018 issue of SEM Student News. This new issue, vol. 14, no. 1, will focus on a theme of Music and Politics with particular attention to music-making as political intervention and discourse. We are seeking article submissions on any topic, but will give preference to those that fit within our theme’s area of discussion. Likewise, we will consider submissions from both students and working scholars alike, and encourage authors to submit pieces in a variety of media.

Submissions may be written, photographic, or multimedia (written with visual, audio, and/or video components). We are currently accepting submissions for the following categories:
  • Original photography related to the issue’s theme
  • Student submissions (c. 200–250 words) for our “Thoughts from the Field” column [relating students' personal perspectives and experiences in the field to the issue's main theme]
  • Student articles (c. 500–1500 words) [related or unrelated to the theme of the issue]
  • Student response column (c. 500–1500 words) [responding to a previous issue of SEM Student News or something else in the world of ethnomusicology today]
  • Professional submissions for our
    • “Dear SEM” column (c. 250 words) [related to the issue’s theme and responding to the following prompt: “Reflecting upon your own knowledge and experience engaging with music-making in politicized contexts, what advice can you offer students regarding the ethics of fieldwork in instability, that is, how to ethically and adeptly navigate highly-political music research?”];
    • Or individual articles (c. 500–1000 words) [related or unrelated to the issue’s theme, and speaking toward student interests, concerns, experiences, opportunities, etc.]
If you would like to submit a piece, please contact the editor at semstudentnews@gmail.com. We also welcome any other ideas, comments, and questions. Submissions should follow Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition (author-date). Files should be submitted in .docx (text), .jpg (photography and images), .mp3 or .flac (audio), and .mp4 (video) formats no later than April 2, 2018. Be sure to include your contact information and university affiliation in your email. Please feel free to share this call widely.

--
Davin Vidigal Rosenberg
Editor, SEM Student News

Friday, February 2, 2018

Call for Submissions: SEM Student News 14.1

Dear Colleagues,

This is the first call for submissions for the Spring/Summer 2018 issue of SEM Student News. This new issue, vol. 14, no. 1, will focus on a theme of Music and Politics with particular attention to music-making as political intervention and discourse. We are seeking article submissions on any topic, but will give preference to those that fit within our theme’s area of discussion. Likewise, we will consider submissions from both students and working scholars alike, and encourage authors to submit pieces in a variety of media.

Submissions may be written, photographic, or multimedia (written with visual, audio, and/or video components). We are currently accepting submissions for the following categories:
  • Original photography related to the issue’s theme
  • Student submissions (c. 200–250 words) for our “Thoughts from the Field” column [relating students' personal perspectives and experiences in the field to the issue's main theme]
  • Student articles (c. 500–1500 words) [related or unrelated to the theme of the issue]
  • Student response column (c. 500–1500 words) [responding to a previous issue of SEM Student News or something else in the world of ethnomusicology today]
  • Professional submissions for our
    • “Dear SEM” column (c. 250 words) [related to the issue’s theme and responding to the following prompt: “Reflecting upon your own knowledge and experience engaging with music-making in politicized contexts, what advice can you offer students regarding the ethics of fieldwork in instability, that is, how to ethically and adeptly navigate highly-political music research?”];
    • Or individual articles (c. 500–1000 words) [related or unrelated to the issue’s theme, and speaking toward student interests, concerns, experiences, opportunities, etc.]
If you would like to submit a piece, please contact the editor at semstudentnews@gmail.com. We also welcome any other ideas, comments, and questions. Submissions should follow Chicago Manual of Style, 17th edition (author-date). Files should be submitted in .docx (text), .jpg (photography and images), .mp3 or .flac (audio), and .mp4 (video) formats no later than April 2, 2018. Be sure to include your contact information and university affiliation in your email. Please feel free to share this call widely.

--
Davin Vidigal Rosenberg
Editor, SEM Student News